Spiritual Retreats can promote feel-good chemicals in the brain

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A study conducted by Thomas Jefferson University shows that more Americans are turning to religious, meditative and spiritual retreats to balance their daily lives and enhance well-being more than ever. Researchers are now able to show the changes in the dopamine and serotonin levels of the brain in participants to retreat from their daily lives to guided getaways.

Andrew Newburg, doctor and Director of Research for the Marcus Institute of Integrative help says, “Since serotonin and dopamine are part of the reward and emotional systems of the brain, it helps us understand why these practices result in powerful, positive emotional experiences,”, and also states, “Our study showed significant changes in dopamine and serotonin transporters after the seven-day retreat, which could help prime participants for the spiritual experiences that they reported.”

Studies show there is more availability for increased emotions to the brain after the retreat. Scans after the retreat show that decreases in dopamine transporters are shown at about 5-8 percent amongst participants and serotonin transporters decreased 6.5 binding. Since more neurotransmitters are available, they are not clustered with negative energy such as stress and tiredness.

The study was focused on 14 Christian participants that showed after a long mass they were able to show improvements in physical health, tension, and fatigue.

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Spiritual Retreats can promote feel-good chemicals in the brain
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Spiritual Retreats can promote feel-good chemicals in the brain
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A study conducted by Thomas Jefferson University shows that more Americans are turning to religious, meditative and spiritual retreats to balance their daily lives and enhance well-being more than ever.
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Emlife
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